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Reading Before Bedtime

Yesterday being Sunday, I had a stupendous siesta. And due to that I could not go to sleep early at my regular time. So I started reading a book: Blink by Malcolm Gladwell.

This is the second book of Gladwell that I've started reading. First being Outliers.

The point of this post is the way I felt after reading a few pages of the book. Reading calmed my mind. After reading for an hour of so, my mind was lot more serene. On other days, I had this problem of not getting immediate sleep due to the constant chatter of my mind. But yesterday was totally different. I went to sleep easily and also got up early by half-an-hour than by regular days and still was feeling fresh.

While reading I observed that it relaxed my whole body too. In a way, it felt like meditation - away from all the notification and distraction world. It allowed me to connect with myself.

In a way, reading before bedtime is a good habit to cultivate.

Book: Outliers

Recently I came across this Amazon company named Audible. Audible sells digital audio books, TV Programs and magazines. To give it a try, as it was free for the first month or so, I downloaded it on my iPhone and was going through the various titles. And then, somehow, I decided to download the audio book: Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell.
Listening to a book is altogether a different experience. And to listen a book on Success and its various factors, requires thorough attention. It's not as easy as listening to songs on your phone.

Anyway, I started listening to the Audio of Outliers. The book was narrated by Gladwell himself. And I must say that I loved his book.
Gladwell is an amazing storyteller and he captivates you with his resourceful topics ranging from hockey players to plane crashes. If you thought that success is all about hardwork; then you're wrong. Success has various factors along with hardwork. It has to do a lot with your upbringing, the place where you're f…

Book: When Breath Becomes Air

I came across this book while reading Bill Gates blog where he shares the books he has read.

And then I ordered it and read it within 2 days. And I must say, this book left me in tears.

Paul Kalanithi, the writer of the book was a neurosurgeon who was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

I've always enjoyed stories from the medical field, about their training and about the massive work they have to do.

But apart from his medical training and the intricacies of neurosurgery, what catches the readers eye is how Paul tries to find the answer to the question about life - What makes this life worth living? Don’t think I ever spent a minute of any day wondering why I did this work, or whether it was worth it. The call to protect life—and not merely life but another’s identity; it is perhaps not too much to say another’s soul—was obvious in its sacredness. Before operating on a patient’s brain, I realized, I must first understand his mind: his identity, his values, what makes his life worth liv…

Book: The 5 Second Rule by Mel Robbins

Just completed reading "The 5 second rule - Transform your Life, Work, and Confidence with Everyday Courage" by Mel Robbins.

I've stopped reading Self Help books since long. It's not that they aren't useful, but I feel that they're all the same. Ever since we had Stephen Covey, Napoleon Hill, Anthony Robbins and the like; every other book on self help are just the same things under different cover.

But this book caught my attention when I'd downloaded Audible on my iPhone and started listening to Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. This book was recommended by Audible based on my selection of Outliers. I just heard the sample on Audible and found the book to be interesting. And so I purchased the book on Kindle and read it on the Amazon Cloud Reader - don't have the Kindle.

The book is plastered with various posts across different social networks from people who have benefited from the tool i.e. the 5 second rule that Mel suggests.

Mel created…

Story of Bug and Debug in Computer Programming

While reading the The Innovators - How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, Chapter 3 deals with the History of Programming.

Most of the programmers find the word "bug" dreadful - as it means the software needs to be reprogrammed as it is not meeting the requirements.

Here's the story of how the term "bug" made its way into Programming.

A Little Background:

One of the initial programmers in the history of Computer Programming was Grace Hopper.

Hopper worked on Mark - I (A Computing Machine) at Harvard University, and later on Mark - II.

She was writing programs for the computing machines and also perfected the practice of subroutines, which is norm now in computer programming. Those were the days when new instructions were submitted via punched paper tape.

The Story of Bug:

Walter Isaacson writes:

In addition, her [Hopper's] crew helped to popularize the terms bug and debugging. The Mark II version of the Harvard Computer was…

Why This Book Should Be Made Compulsory In Engineering Colleges

A new book arrived at the small library we have at my workplace.

The Innovators - How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution  by Walter Isaacson.

Isaacson is the same guy who wrote Steve Jobs.

I issued the book from the library and have started reading.

In the first chapter, the writer introduces us that how the Digital world changed over time and how initial innovators of the age brought the changes that we have adapted to.

 I've been a teacher (Assistant Professor) in a few Engineering Colleges of Gujarat in my previous jobs, teaching subjects related to Computers and Information Technology.

And I found that as teachers we had very little time to teach the history of Computers and Internet.

As a result, the students never went into the amazing history of this Digital Revolution.

All they're concerned with cramming the Digital Circuits and a few Programs in different computer languages to be asked in the exams.

Students never come to know how al…

We Have Lost Touch With Humanity

I was reading Robin Sharma's - "Who Will Cry When You Die?". Love reading the book because I can start reading from any page. And each small lesson of these little book provides food for thought.

I read this book whenever I'm short of time, but want to read. It is great.

A small excerpt from the very first lesson of the book:

We can fire a missile across the world with pinpoint accuracy, but we have trouble keeping a date with our children to go to the library. We have e-mail, fax machines and digital phones so that we can stay connected and yet we live in a time where human beings have never been less connected. We have lost touch with our humanity. We have lost touch with our purpose. We have lost sight of the things that matter the most. Isn't it worth pondering? We're busy checking our phones and emails every 5 minutes but we forget to check our purpose, our goals and our family members. We continuously try to refresh our news feed on Facebook and Twitte…