October 19, 2012

Tips For Your Technical Interviews

Just read nice tips given by Christian Johnson, who is a master's student at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute studying electrical engineering and a former Google intern. 

What If Android Was Developed in Gujarat ?

One of the most popular operating system in cell phones these days is Android, which is basically a Linux-based operating system developed by Google in conjunction with the Open Handset Alliance.

Android 1.0, the first commercial version of Android was released way back in 2008 and since then it has seen a number of updates. However, after April 2009, Android versions have been codenamed alphabetically with the names of dessert items (or sweet food items). The first codenamed version of Android was Cupcake, followed by Donut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread, Honey Comb, Icecream Sandwich and Jelly Bean.

If Android was developed in India, then the names of these Android versions would be like :

Cupcake                     Chikki

Donut                         Doodh paak

Eclair                          Elaaichi

Froyo                         Faafda

Gingerbread               Gulaab Jamun

Honey Comb              Halvo

Icecream Sandwich    Ice Gola

Jelly Bean                  Jalebi

Kit-Kat                       Khakhra

Lollipop                     Laddu

Marshmallow             Mohanthaal

Update: Gujarati names for Kit0Kat, Lollipop and Marshmallow are given by Anand Sutariya.


October 17, 2012

Exploring Google's Data Center

Explore a Google data center with Street View. Beautiful Views


October 15, 2012

The Pleasures of Reading

Yet another post from Rajesh Jain's blog.  

Here's what he writes - 

I have experienced this so many times. A book that I am reading helps me think through a conundrum I have been contemplating and creates the space for coming up with interesting ideas and solutions. The book doesn't even have to be directly linked to the topic – what it does is forces deep thought, and then the associations in the mind create something that wasn't there before.
That is one of the reasons I love to read. Just the act of sitting for an extended period of undisturbed time with a book is guaranteed to push the mind in many different directions – some intended by the author, some unintended by the reader!
I don't necessarily read every book immediately after I buy it. I let it stay around, and then some day, I will pick it up – and the book opens up its treasure chest of ideas. It is a wonderful feeling.

On Writing One's Obituary

I have always liked reading Rajesh Jain's blog. He has written about Writing One's Obituary. And I think I should try it out too. Here's what he writes -

I was talking to a friend recently, and the topic turned to what to do with the rest of one's life. It was then that I suggested that he should write his obituary and then work backwards from there.

Let me explain. We normally think incrementally forward from where we are – the next few months or the next year, and so on. Another approach that I had once read was to think of what one would like to be remembered by. Imagine if The Economist wrote a 1-page obituary after your death – what would it read like. Or, what you would like it to read like. And then live life to accomplish the things you have written.

I did this a few years ago, and it helped me think of life differently, and got me started on the track to helping bring about change in India.

Try it out. There is little to lose. On the one hand, it could just end up being an intellectual exercise. On the other, it could help give a new meaning and perspective to the rest of your life.